Tag Archives: The Art of Perseverance in Australian feature film making

Article: Going from Monsters to Godzilla: Director Gareth Edwards gives advice to filmmakers.

Article in No Film
Author: Jo Marine
Published: 30th April
Gareth Edwards, who you might know from his very DIY film Monsters, is back with another monster film, Godzilla. While he’s got quite a bit more money to spend on this project than the last ($160 million versus Monsters which was made for under $1 million), the basic aspects of filmmaking are no different, and regardless of budget, it still takes the same discipline. Gareth, who has been in VFX most of his career, has been working towards his goal of becoming a director from a very early age, and shares some fantastic advice to all filmmakers:

Read the full article here:

Advice to Filmmakers

Starting Out:


Getting the Call:

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Research: Artfacts

Some golden research into Australia’s arts industry.

It’s time to get the facts.
Art Facts is the new home for statistics about Australian arts. Here you will find a range of facts about Australia’s vibrant arts sectors and the latest trends in art creation, industry, global trade, participation and support.
Explore visual arts and craft statistics: from how many people attend galleries and do visual arts and craft to how much visual artists earn and the international connections of Australian arts practice.
Find out more about music: from what musicians earn to concert ticket sales and how many rock songs were released last year.
Research by The Australia Council


Check out the website here

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Media Relase – Fell released online

We have just had the privilege of filming Director Kasimir Burgess and Producer John Maynard and hear them discuss their new feature film Fell.

They have made the bold decision to release the film online. Here is the Media Release. Get your credit cards out and support this intriguing film!
Video interview forthcoming.

THE 61ST SYDNEY FILM FESTIVAL & ADELAIDE FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCE
VOD (VIDEO-ON-DEMAND) STREAMING OF WORLD PREMIERE FILM: FELL

FELL image005

The 61st Sydney Film Festival and Adelaide Film Festival announce a video-on-demand stream of the Australian feature film Fell direct from its World Premiere at Sydney Film Festival on Tuesday 10 June.

Sydney Film Festival and Adelaide Film Festival will break with tradition and stream online the World Premiere Australian film Fell over the same weekend that it premieres in Official Competition at the State Theatre in Sydney.

“Sydney Film Festival is pleased to offer audiences across Australia the chance to have their own virtual festival premiere screening,” said Sydney Film Festival Director Nashen Moodley. “Fell will be available online from the Sydney Film Festival website on the day of the premiere, giving audiences beyond Sydney’s State Theatre access to the World Premiere of this stunning debut feature.”

Fell will screen in high definition to any Internet-enabled device: Smart TV, digital TV, touchscreen tablet, PC, laptop, game console or smartphone. It will be available on streaming for 50 hours from 8pm Friday 13 June EST until 10pm Sunday 15 June AEST. The film will be available to everyone in New South Wales, Queensland, Australian Capital Territory South Australia and Northern Territory.

“This is a really exciting way to explore the virtual film festival experience with a great new Australian film. We would love to hear about the midnight screening party in Alice Springs through to the matinee session in a living room in Goolwa. Adelaide Film Festival home delivery,” said Adelaide Film Festival Director Amanda Duthie.

“The World Premiere of Fell via the Internet is a game-changer in a multi-screen world. It’s democratic, it’s inclusive and it’s about time,” said the film’s producer, John Maynard.

Fell – more information and trailer: http://fellfilm.com

Sydney Film Festival runs for 12 days from Wednesday 4 June and screens over 190 films across nine venues including the magnificent State Theatre. Over 100 filmmaker guests attend the Festival to take part in talks, panels and Q&As. For the most up-to-date information on screenings and guests visit sff.org.au

Article: Just Something – 22 characteristics of creative people.

creative-people-small
“Top characteristics of…” is a well worn publishers clickbait trick, and so when I came across the Just Something article “22things creative people do differently” it didn’t fill me with too much anticipation.

This one is quite nicely done, with good supporting images, if somewhat predictable, but what was more interesting is reading the lengthy comments section, for some robust debate on the definition of creativity, and there is some discussion as to why creativity too often refers to ‘art’ and not ‘science’.

Enjoy the article here, published in Just Something on April 30th.

Video – The mindset to succeed in elite sports

My research looks at the levels of perseverance in creatives, and especially in the filmmaker. However, parallels can be found in other sectors, and elite sport is one such sector. This TEDx video from Professor Tim Noakes was interesting. I thought of Michael Budd and how he elected to go from development to distribution in under a year with his film Love of my Life. Such laser focussed discipline to achieve his goal similar to a elite athlete preparing for the Olympics.

I shall be further investigating research in the elite sports sector.

Published on 26 Jun 2012

Prof. Tim Noakes is a co-founder and executive director of the Sports Science Institute of SA. He is an author, respected academic and A1 rated scientist and has long been acknowledged as an expert in the field of sports and the science of physical exercise. Tim is a Director of UCT/MRC Research Unit for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine (ESSM). In this talk from TEDxCapeTownED, he lays out the importance of belief in exceptional achievement, and points to the role of the coach in fostering that belief. He leaves a challenge with educators to see their role as creating belief in their students.

Find out more about TEDxCapeTownED athttp://TEDxCapeTownED.org/

Find out more about the ESSM at http://www.essm.uct.ac.za/

Article: Junkee – “How to make it in the Australian Film industry” by Dee Jefferson

I have enjoyed the writings of Dee Jefferson over the years in many publications, least not least when she gave me a great review for a theatre show a few years back!

Dee has written a great article in Junkee about How to make it in the Australian Film industry. She challenges us to check how many films made in 2012 we have heard of, never mind seen.
Take a look here for yourself. and read the whole article here.
She then zeros in on three  first-time feature directors who will be premiering and/or releasing their babies in cinemas over the next few months: Zak Hilditch (These Final Hours, showing in Directors Fortnight in Cannes); Jennifer Kent (The Babadook); and Sophie Hyde (52 Tuesdays).

What I liked about this article is that Dee avoided the doom and gloom and ‘slag-off Screen Australia’ approach so oft used by journalists and social media naysayers, but elected to focus on a few key points to inspire future filmmaking projects

I think its time I introduced myself to Dee and had a chat.

I also think its time we all went and watched those three films and gave those inspiring creatives some moral and financial support.

So check out the trailer for 52 Tuesdays:

 

Films – Milius

As the voiceover in the trailer below says “John Milius had more movies made than any other writer in the history of Hollywood.” And yet the industry eventually chucked him out by the sounds of it due to his stubborn perseverance to do things his way. This stubbornness offers a unique insight of perseverance – yes you gotta maintain your own voice but you also have to play the game, play the industry to a certain extent. Bow down to the industry too much and you lose your art, your creativity. A fine line? 

The film looks well worthwhile watching.

Milius:
Here is the life story of one of the most influential and controversial film directors in the history of Hollywood, John Milius. From his childhood aspirations to join the military to his formative years at the USC Film School, his legendary work on films such as Apocalypse Now, Jaws, Conan The Barbar-ian, Dirty Harry and Red Dawn, to his ultimate dismissal from Hollywood due to his radical beliefs and controversial behavior.

milius