Category Archives: Films

The Tunnel by Carlo Ledesma

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Synopsis:

In 2007 the NSW government suddenly scrapped a plan to utilise the water in the disused underground train tunnels beneath Sydney.

In 2008, chasing rumours of a government coverup and urban legends surrounding the sudden backflip, investigative journalist Natasha Warner led a crew of four into the underground labyrinth.

They went down into the tunnels looking for a story – until the story found them.
This is the film of their harrowing ordeal. With unprecedented access to the recently declassified tapes they shot in the claustrophobic subway tunnels, as well as a series of candid interviews with the survivors, we come face to face with the terrifying truth.

This never before seen footage takes us deep inside the tunnels bringing the darkness to life and capturing the raw fear that threatens to tear the crew apart, leaving each one of them fighting for their lives.

The 135k Project:

The Internet was meant to be a tool to connect us. It was meant to break down borders and liberate. Now we have an entire generation who are being labelled criminals for using that tool. But perhaps rather than wasting millions of dollars fighting a losing battle against internet piracy, we should try and find a way to embrace the possibilities that this new world brings…

That’s the thought that inspired this project. We believe that if we stop fighting the peer to peer networks, they could become the biggest revolution we have ever seen in the way we share entertainment and information.

After spending years being frustrated by what we saw as the movie industry’s short-sighted and conventional outlook towards the online community, we decided it was time to try something different – The 135K Project was born.

We figured that movie posters and collectable frames from movies are being sold every day, so what if we could raise the money to make “The Tunnel” by selling every individual frame of it? We would be able to make a movie unencumbered by a studio’s need for box office. We could do what we got into the industry to do in the first place. Tell stories we like and get them out there so people could enjoy them.

What’s the key to doing that? You.

If you like the look of “The Tunnel” or the idea behind The 135K Project – buy a frame or two, blog about it, follow us on twitter, seed and embed the finished film when it’s released. Whatever you can do. It will all help and show the world there might just be another way. Who knows where that might lead?

Trailer:

Links to the film:

Website: http://www.thetunnelmovie.net
Event Zero: http://www.eventzeroseries.com
Airlock: http://www.distractedmedia.tv
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1735485/
Facebook:
https://www.facebook.com/TheTunnelMovie
Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Tunnel_%282011_film%29

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Matching Jack by Nadia Tass

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Synopsis:

Life seems idyllic for Marisa (Jacinda Barrett) and her son, Jack (Tom Russell), until a poor performance at a school soccer match ends with Jack in hospital and Marisa trying to find her husband, David (Richard Roxburgh), who is interstate at a conference.  In fact, David is planning to leave Marisa for his current mistress (Yvonne Strahovski), with his phone off and not a care in the world.

Jack is diagnosed with leukaemia and the only possibility of a cure is if David has had a child from one of his many flings who could be a bone marrow donor.  So Marisa looks back through his diaries, figures when he could have been having affairs, and goes out door knocking.  Unsuspecting women face a desperate mother as Marisa searches high and low for possibilities and the full scale of David’s infidelity is revealed.

Meanwhile, Jack befriends Finn (Kodi Smit-McPhee) a young Irish boy in the next bed.  He has been travelling the world with his father, Connor (James Nesbitt).  Initial disdain turns to mutual respect as both Marisa and Connor find their own ways to deal with their respective sons’ illnesses.

MATCHING JACK beautifully captures the power of love and the resilience of the human spirit…with a gentle and uplifting ending, that hints at a future full of hope.

Producer’s Statement:

It’s rare that a great story, which has the right elements to make an effective drama, comes your way. MATCHING JACK is one of those projects.

The idea that a boy’s life is saved through his father’s infidelity is loaded to the max. Ironic, emotive, call it what you like – it’s going to take an audience on a journey through pain, love, despair, humour and hope.

Let’s look at some of the elements. The clock is ticking right through this script; a cure must be found for this child’s leukaemia; and in the next bed is a boy for which there is no cure. Here is passion and pain, despair and pathos. The boy’s father’s infidelity is exposed in the worst possible way; yet it is this infidelity that ultimately saves Jack’s life. What a paradox; what a Pandora’s box of emotions; nothing is simple here. A woman scorned, a child facing death, the search for a bone marrow donor is futile, unless the husband has had a child out of wedlock. The mother, Marisa, grabs this slim thread and, by delving into the husband’s past diaries, pinpoints women that her philandering husband may have been with. And then she goes door-knocking. Unsuspecting women are confronted with their past as Marisa tries to ascertain whether these are children that may have been fathered by her husband.

This is a film based in reality and like real life it waivers between the highs and lows that we all experience. Confronting, thought provoking, heart breaking – a great story for now, for an audience from twenty years of age onwards – uplifting and tragic, funny and moving. It’s a story for you.

David Parker

Trailer:

Links to the film:

Website: http://www.matchingjack.com/
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1447499/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/matchingjack
Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matching_Jack

Redd Inc. by Daniel Krige

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About the film:

REDD INC. is a bloody original Australian horror film starring Bad Boy Bubby himself, Nicholas Hope, and also featuring a cameo from make-up FX maestro Tom Savini who also oversees the design and execution of the films brilliant SFX.

One of the most original, fun and downright nasty local horror flicks in a long time. Nic Hope is a revelation as the demented Reddmann and it makes you wonder why he isn’t being cast in more horror films…

Synopsis:

Convicted ‘Headhunter’ serial killer and former corporate manager, Thomas Reddmann (Redd) is demented from experimental procedures endured at the unorthodox mental asylum from which he has escaped. Redd maintains his innocence and is determined to prove it. He creates Redd Incorporated (REDD INC.), a twisted version of the modern office environment, filling it with six abducted people he holds directly responsible for his incarceration. His captive ‘human resources’ are literally chained to their desks and forced to perform the impossible job of finding the real killer. They must work in gruelling circumstances to prove the unprovable or face gruesome consequences.

REDD INC is a macabre office where written warnings are carved into foreheads, filing cabinets overflow with body parts and a trip to HR is likely to end in a grisly “termination”.

Trailer:

Links to the film:

Website: http://blog.reddincthemovie.com/
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1857842/?ref_=nm_flmg_dr_1
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Reddincthemovie

Touch by Chris Houghton

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Synopsis:

Touch is a haunting mystery that unfolds layer by layer about Dawn, and her daughter Steph, who take to the road after Dawn assaults a man. Hiding out in a secluded motel, Dawn is desperate to keep her daughter hidden yet entertains a risky sexual liaison with a local cop, Nick, by night. Dawn is hiding from something far greater than her words or actions reveal and when the man tracking her closes in, her past finally catches up with her and a shattering truth is revealed, forcing her to go to the one place she doesn’t want to face.

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The Creatives:

Touch is written and directed by Christopher Houghton, whose short films have screened at festivals around the world. His short film SWING won Best Film at St Kilda International Film Festival and was nominated for Best Short Film at the 2007 AFI Awards. Christopher recently completed his first feature documentary SONS & MOTHERS that premiered at the Adelaide Film Festival 2013. Touch is his first dramatic feature.

Touch is produced by Julie Byrne. Julie is also producer of the surrealist mystery The Dead Speak Back, a film by Jason Sweeney, that premiered at the Adelaide Film Festival 2013.

Trailer:

Links to the film:

Website: http://www.touchthemovie.com.au/
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm2749482/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/touchthemovieAUS?ref=br_rs

Love Marriage in Kabul by Amin Palangi

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Synopsis:

Mahboba Rawi is a strong-willed Afghan-Australian woman who has dedicated her life to help orphans in Afghanistan. She is the founder of Mahboba’s Promise and a mother figure for thousands of orphans and widows currently supported by her programs. Abdul, one of these orphans, is in love with Fatemeh, the girl next door. The two have been exchanging romantic letters for almost a year and hope to marry each other one day. But Fatemeh’s father has other plans – he has decided to marry her off to anyone who can offer a large sum of money as her dowry. Devastated, Abdul is hoping when Mahboba arrives for her yearly trip to Kabul, that she will help him again. When Mahboba hears the story, she is very concerned about Abdul, and Fatemeh’s possible fate in a forced marriage, She is determined to make the marriage happen between Abdul and Fatemah. However, the demands that Fatemeh’s father makes are beyond anyone’s expectations. He won’t let the marriage take place unless Mahboba pays him $10,000 or finds a wife for his eldest son who then can replace Fatemeh in taking care of the household. With nothing to Abdul’s name, the fate of the couple depends entirely on Mahboba’s ability to meet or negotiate the father’s terms. But Mahboba only has one month and limited resources.

Director’s Statement:

It was in early 2006 when my wife Sanaz Fotouhi and I embarked on a journey to make a film in Afghanistan. I was an Honours student at the Australian National University then and determined to make a documentary in Iran or Afghanistan. As a migrant, I was going through a stage where I wanted to understand my background and represent different aspects of it to the world where I was living. Filming in Iran was not as easy as I imagined. To get permission to film there meant months of paper work, which I did not have. As luck would have it, my father-in-law had recently been appointed to establish a bank in Kabul. This made my choice a lot easier.

01 I began researching for a topic online and by contacting different NGO organisations. One of the issues that continuously came up was the increase in women’s self-immolation as a form of suicide. I was intrigued and horrified by records showing a massive increase of cases of self-immolation since the fall of the Taliban in 2004.

This formed the central question for my film and after travelling to Kabul twice that year I managed to make a 15-minute documentary on the reasons behind this issue. The film was screened in Australia and internationally, and won a few awards. It was generally received well by audiences. I was happy about this, since after meeting and filming a lot of the young girls in the burn units that have attempted suicide, I had a great sense of responsibility to tell the world their stories.

However, after one of my screening in Australia, I overheard a conversation between two audience members. “It’s Afghanistan, this sort of shit happens there!” This was like a knockout punch to my face. I was hoping that after watching the film people would to identify with the situation of these young girls. But instead it seemed that like many other outsiders, I had only added to the existing stereotypes of the western world.
Concerned by this idea, I felt compelled to make another film in Afghanistan. It was around this time that I was introduced to Mahboba Rawi. She was a strong-willed, enthusiastic Afghan-Australian woman who, through her charity organisation, Mahboba’s Promise, has been raising money to provide support and education to more than two thousands orphans and widows in Afghanistan.02

I was greatly curious about her work and her huge ambitions. Her own life story I found incredible. She was a woman who had to escaped Kabul at the age of fourteen, lived in refugee camps of Pakistan, and eventually married and came to Australia. But her life was turned upside down when she lost her small son in a drowning accident. However, instead of letting all these struggles consume her, she had made a promise with her God to save all orphans of Afghanistan. Through her charity organization called Mahboba’s Promise she has been able to help thousands of orphans and widows in Afghanistan. If her presence and quirky attitude did not capture me, her story and what she was doing most certainly had me hooked in.

It was during our first meetings that Mahboba asked me to make a film about her. I soon realised that she would ask this pretty much of anyone who has ever held a camera. She knew the importance of media and wanted to spread the word about her work. I felt that making a film about this courageous Afghan women, was my chance to repay my debt to Afghanistan.03Of course this was not easy, I wanted to find a story that was not merely showcasing a charity worker or a welfare corporate video to help Mahboba’s Promise. I wanted to tell a human story that shows the great ripple effect Mahboba’s work is having in Afghanistan. I kept in touch with her and looked for ideas for over two years. It was in early 2009 that Mahboba told me that she was going back to Afghanistan to attend to her projects, one of which was about a marriage between one of the orphans and a girl who lived next to the orphanage. After many months of search, this seemed to be it.
This was the story I wanted to tell. The fact that it was potentially a love story with a happy ending meant that the western audience could relate to it, but it could also showcase how Mahboba’s work for these orphans does not finish with providing food and shelter. Her engagement with these kids was an ongoing investment in changing the future of a country.

To make this story, we self-funded the trip with our own savings as a two member team and headed to Kabul with Mahboba. I would do the camera work and Sanaz, the sound.

04Having been to Afghanistan previously, I was very familiar with the challenges of shooting a film there. I had been arrested and put in prison, slapped at the border crossing by security guards and generally been under constant surveillance by the secret police there. Added to this was being worried about my wife Sanaz who, to be honest, seemed a lot more courageous than me. With all this in mind we embarked on our journey.

On the plane on our way there, I remember the only thing I was asking the universe for was more DRAMA and good God, didn’t the universe just deliver!

Trailer:

Links to the film:

Website: http://lovemarriageinkabul.com
IMDB: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt3824592/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LoveMarriageinKabul

Love of My Life by Michael Budd

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About the film:

Love of My Life is a 2013 Australian horror/thriller directed and produced by Michael Budd in his directorial debut. The film stars Peter O’Brien, Diarmid Heidenreich, Michael Budd, and Bel Delia. It premiered at the 2013 second annual Mt. Hood Independent Film Festival in the state of Oregon U.S.A.

Synopsis:

Inside one of the many operating theatres of an old, rundown abandoned hospital, a man awakes strapped to a table, disorientated and scared. On the side of the room a single monitor, showing him a live feed of his loved one trapped downstairs in what looks to be the morgue. Then a man appears, decked out in surgeon’s scrubs, and explains the situation to him – “For five days, I am going to do unspeakable, Godless things to you. You are going to scream, and beg, and plead for me to stop. Then at the end of day five, I’m going to kill you. And when I’ve killed you, I’ll let her go. However, if at any point you can take no more, if at any point you want me to stop, all you have to do is say, “Enough”. And I’ll stop. And then I’ll kill her. So ask yourself now, do you really want to go to your grave knowing she was the last person you ever kissed, touched, held, made love to? Is she the love of your life?” This act has played itself out many, many times. And sad as it is to say, no man has ever come close to making past day one.

Trailer:

Links to the film:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lomlfilm
IMDB:
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2246831
Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_of_My_Life_(film)

Film – ‘The Death of ‘Superman Lives’; What Happened?’ Trailer #2: Documentary On The Failed Tim Burton Film

The latest in documentaries on films that never happened (Lost in La Mancha, Burdern of Dreams, Heart of Darkness), which give an insight into The Art of Perseverance.
Judging by the trailer Tim burton took his creatiev visio too far away from the comic’s orgins

Article copied from Slash Films
Posted on Tuesday, August 19th, 2014 by Germain Lussier
In this 2nd Full Trailer for the Feature Film Documentary “The Death of Superman Lives; What Happened?”, we go a little deeper into the misconceptions that the public had of this production, and the effects that had on everyone involved.

Superman Lives is one of the biggest mysteries in modern film history. After making the blockbuster superhero film Batman, filmmaker Tim Burton decided he would try to do something similar for Superman. Kevin Smith wrote a script, Burton cast Nicolas Cage in the lead role and got deep in to pre-production. However, at some point, it got canned. To this day, photos and videos from the pre-production set the Internet on fire.

But what happened? Well filmmaker Jon Schnepp decided to find out. He’a almost done with production on the documentary The Death of Superman Lives; What Happened? and to keep interest piqued, he’s released a second full trailer in as many months.