Monthly Archives: June 2014

Video: Metroscreen ‘Screen 2030: Making Content Pay’

Those good folk at Metroscreen put on a great event called Screen 2030: Making Content Pay and also produced this accompanying video, which gives a great insight into the future of content. The video includes my fellow Masters student Marcus Gillezeau, and Ester Harding who is in the year below me. And I’ve also worked with Galvin, Louise and Tim so lots of familiar faces in here.

Published on 11 Jun 2014
SCREEN 2030: MAKING MY CONTENT PAY
An exploration of the future careers of content makers by some of the screen and media industry’s key thinkers, discussing the issues of changing audiences and distribution for screen content.

Metro Screen looks ahead to the next 10-15 years and asks the big questions: What will the screen industry look like in 2030 and will a creative screen career pay the rent?

Featuring
Georgie McClean, Senior Manager of Strategy, Research and Communications at Screen Australia
Mark Pesce, futurist (Moore’s Cloud)
Marcus Gillezeau, digital producer (Firelight Productions)
Mike Jones, writer (Portal Entertainment)
Louise O’Donnell, writer/producer (Hoodlum)
Sandy George, media commentator
Peter Giles, educator, developer and producer (2and2)
Galvin Scott Davis (Protein One)
Ester Harding, documentary producer (Storm Surfers 3D, I Am a Girl, Goa Hippy Tribe)

Hosted by Tim Parsons

Produced by Metro Screen’s Digital Kitchen
Financed in association with Screen New South Wales
©Metro Screen 2014

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Research: Arts Council – Bums on seats

Some more good research from The Arts Council looking at participation in the Arts. It doesn’t include film as thats the realm of Screen Australia but I am assuming that the statistics would have similar results if applied to the film sector as well, and thought the research would be of value to readers of this website.

Screenshot 2014-06-02 09.15.25

Arts in Daily Life: Australian participation in the arts is an independent study commissioned by the Australia Council, which provides insight into how Australians participate in the arts today.

It provides a comparison of shifting attitudes and behaviours by benchmarking the findings in 2013 against those from the original study in 2009.

The outcomes of this study paint a positive picture. Overall engagement with the arts is up and public attitudes to the arts are highly positive. Some of the key results tell us that:

Australians think the arts enrich our lives
Australians value Indigenous arts and there are great opportunities to grow audiences
The arts are important in the lives of Australian children
More Australians are participating in the arts
The Council has a deep commitment to ensuring there is a sound base of evidence to lead and support a national conversation about arts and culture in Australia. We hope this report provides valuable insights and enables you play an active part in this conversation.

You can download the 90 page report here

Book: Shining a Light – 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute

Since its establishment in 1958, the AFI has played a central role in nurturing and supporting both screen culture and production, from the Australian film industry’s small beginnings to its development into an internationally recognised billion dollar industry. Shining a Light maps out the history of the AFI and the wider industry over the past fifty years and explores the relationship of screen culture to a successful production industry.

Shining A Light Cover V6.indd

The book offers a timely and significant contribution to scholarship on Australian cinema, and is published at a critical time in Australian film history. The authors have interviewed key players on the local scene, undertaken twenty-seven interviews, and sifted through volumes of documentary evidence to chronicle the history of the AFI, its successes and role in Australian screen culture past, present and future.

Check out the website here

Buy the book here
iTunes
Book

Media Relase – Fell released online

We have just had the privilege of filming Director Kasimir Burgess and Producer John Maynard and hear them discuss their new feature film Fell.

They have made the bold decision to release the film online. Here is the Media Release. Get your credit cards out and support this intriguing film!
Video interview forthcoming.

THE 61ST SYDNEY FILM FESTIVAL & ADELAIDE FILM FESTIVAL ANNOUNCE
VOD (VIDEO-ON-DEMAND) STREAMING OF WORLD PREMIERE FILM: FELL

FELL image005

The 61st Sydney Film Festival and Adelaide Film Festival announce a video-on-demand stream of the Australian feature film Fell direct from its World Premiere at Sydney Film Festival on Tuesday 10 June.

Sydney Film Festival and Adelaide Film Festival will break with tradition and stream online the World Premiere Australian film Fell over the same weekend that it premieres in Official Competition at the State Theatre in Sydney.

“Sydney Film Festival is pleased to offer audiences across Australia the chance to have their own virtual festival premiere screening,” said Sydney Film Festival Director Nashen Moodley. “Fell will be available online from the Sydney Film Festival website on the day of the premiere, giving audiences beyond Sydney’s State Theatre access to the World Premiere of this stunning debut feature.”

Fell will screen in high definition to any Internet-enabled device: Smart TV, digital TV, touchscreen tablet, PC, laptop, game console or smartphone. It will be available on streaming for 50 hours from 8pm Friday 13 June EST until 10pm Sunday 15 June AEST. The film will be available to everyone in New South Wales, Queensland, Australian Capital Territory South Australia and Northern Territory.

“This is a really exciting way to explore the virtual film festival experience with a great new Australian film. We would love to hear about the midnight screening party in Alice Springs through to the matinee session in a living room in Goolwa. Adelaide Film Festival home delivery,” said Adelaide Film Festival Director Amanda Duthie.

“The World Premiere of Fell via the Internet is a game-changer in a multi-screen world. It’s democratic, it’s inclusive and it’s about time,” said the film’s producer, John Maynard.

Fell – more information and trailer: http://fellfilm.com

Sydney Film Festival runs for 12 days from Wednesday 4 June and screens over 190 films across nine venues including the magnificent State Theatre. Over 100 filmmaker guests attend the Festival to take part in talks, panels and Q&As. For the most up-to-date information on screenings and guests visit sff.org.au